CLOSE

African-American singles are the least likely to marry, the census says
Tamika Miller knows what she wants in a husband.

Her Mr. Right would be ambitious and driven, well-mannered and polite, smart, attractive, faithful and, of course, ready for family life.
But the 35-year-old Alsip woman has one thing hampering her dating search: she’s an African-American woman hoping to meet and marry an African-American man. And that puts her in the category of singles least likely to marry, according to U.S. census figures.
“I am getting older. I’ve never been married. I don’t have any children. And that’s something that I want in my life,” she said. “It’s hard to meet black guys who want to be in a committed relationship. And that’s what I’m looking for.”
Recently, stories like Miller’s have been recounted so often that they’ve created a boutique industry — comedian Steve Harvey and actor Hill Harper have written books on the matter; there have been reality shows, blogs and YouTube videos; and ABC produced a “Nightline” segment on the topic.
But now a different conversation is emerging in the black community. Rather than fixate on the bleak statistics, some have started working to bring singles together in ways once considered taboo by many African-Americans.
They are orchestrating matches on Twitter and Facebook. Some are hosting meet-ups and living-room gatherings for black singles to mix and mingle. Others are luring singles into their lounges for candid conversations about how to date and how to find true love.
Click here to continue reading.

SOURCE: Chicago Tribune
Lolly Bowean

×